Sanders wins Kansas, Nebraska; Clinton takes Louisiana

Printed from: http://newbostonpost.com/2016/03/05/sanders-wins-kansas-nebraska-clinton-takes-louisiana/

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas and Nebraska Democrats gave Bernie Sanders a win, while Louisiana lined up behind Hillary Clinton on Saturday’s contests for the Democratic nomination for president.

Campaigning in Detroit, Clinton said she was thrilled to add to her delegate count and expected to do well in Michigan’s primary on Tuesday.

“No matter who wins this Democratic nomination,” she said, “I have not the slightest doubt that on our worst day we will be infinitely better than the Republicans on their best day.”

Tara Evans, a 52-year-old quilt maker from Bellevue, Nebraska, said she was caucusing for Clinton, and happy to know that the former first lady could bring her husband back to the White House.

“I like Bernie, but I think Hillary had the best chance of winning,” she said.

Sanders won by solid margins in Nebraska and Kansas, giving him seven victories so far in the nominating season, compared to 11 for Clinton, who still maintains a commanding lead in competition for delegates.

Vermont Sen. Sanders, in an interview with the Associated Press, pointed to his wide margins of victory and called it evidence that his political revolution is coming to pass.

Stressing the important of voter turnout, he said, “when large numbers of people come — working people, young people who have not been involved in the political process — we will do well and I think that is bearing out tonight.”

 

Clinton hoped that strong support among African-Americans in Louisiana would propel her to victory. Sanders, trailing far behind Clinton in the delegate count, had higher hopes of making progress in Nebraska and Kansas, where the Democratic electorate is less diverse.

 

Heading into Saturday’s voting, Clinton had 1,066 delegates to Sanders’ 432, including superdelegates — members of Congress, governors and party officials who can support the candidate of their choice. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination. There were 109 at stake on Saturday.

Clinton and Sanders both campaigned in Michigan, a sign of the importance both attach to the state’s primary on Tuesday.

Before caucuses and polls closed in today’s contests, Clinton met with about 20 African-American ministers in Detroit and said “the future” of the Supreme Court was on the ballot in November’s general election.

Sanders, at a rally in suburban Warren, stressed his opposition to “disastrous” trade agreements that he said cost U.S. jobs. He’s hoping his emphasis on reducing income inequality plays well in a state hit hard over the years by shifting economic trends and globalization.

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